Silverstone is the current home of the British Grand Prix, which it first hosted in 1948. The 1950 British Grand Prix at Silverstone was the first race [4] in the newly created World Championship of Drivers.[5] The race rotated between Silverstone, Aintree and Brands Hatch from 1955 to 1986, but relocated permanently to Silverstone in 1987. The circuit also hosts the British round of the MotoGP series.

Silverstone is built on the site of a World War II Royal Air Force bomber station, RAF Silverstone, which opened in 1943. The airfield’s three runways, in classic WWII triangle format, lie within the outline of the present track

Silverstone was first used for motorsport by an ad hoc group of friends who set up an impromptu race in September 1947. One of their members, Maurice Geoghegan, lived in nearby Silverstone village and was aware that the airfield was deserted. He and eleven other drivers raced over a two-mile circuit, during the course of which Geoghegan himself ran over a sheep that had wandered onto the airfield. The sheep was killed and the car written off, and in the aftermath of this event the informal race became known as the Mutton Grand Prix

Known as the ‘home of British motorsport’, Silverstone is the UK’s most famous track and features some of the best corners in F1 – including Copse and the Maggotts/Becketts complex. Despite the current layout differing greatly compared to the original, it remains one of the few ‘old-school’ circuits in the sport. It’s a busy and popular track, with a range of other championships (like FIA WEC and BTCC), racing there.